Shayla's Favorite Reads

Looking for guidance on publishing or writing? These are all books I've personally read and highly recommend. Each book has personally helped me, and I know they'll help you too in your bookish journey.

 
 

Publishing 101 by Jane Friedman

Whether you’ve finished a manuscript or just have the seeds of an idea, learn how to smartly approach editors and agents with your work, while avoiding the pitfalls of first-time authorship.

 

Writer's Market 2018 

Want to get published and paid for your writing? Let Writer's Market 2018 guide you with thousands of publishing opportunities—including listings for book publishers, consumer and trade magazines, contests and awards, and literary agents. These listings feature contact and submission information so you can get started right away.

 
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Guide to Literary Agents 2018

No matter what you're writing—fiction or nonfiction, books for adults or children—securing a literary agent will help you get the best book deal possible from a traditional publisher. With listing information for more than 1,000 agents who represent writers and their books, Guide to Literary Agents 2018 will be your go-to resource.

 

The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi

One of the biggest problem areas for writers is conveying a character's emotions to the reader in a unique, compelling way. This book comes to the rescue by highlighting 75 emotions and listing the possible body language cues, thoughts, and visceral responses for each.

 

The Novel Planner by Kristen Kieffer

The Novel Planner is the perfect daily planner for authors. Hobby writers, first-time novelists, and professional authors alike will love the structure and organization this daily planner provides.

 

The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists

This book will inspire, nourish, and provide the needed kick in the pants to turn the wannabes into doers! The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists is full of "aha" experiences as the reader uncovers the collected wisdom from the cream of today’s fiction writers.

 

The Elements of Style by Strunk & White

You know the authors' names. You recognize the title. You've probably used this book yourself. This is The Elements of Style, the classic style manual. This book's unique tone, wit and charm have conveyed the principles of English style to millions of readers.

 

Starting Your Career as a Freelance Editor

If you've ever considered editing as a career, this book will help you on your new path. You’ll learn about the requirements in various fields, how to get started, the step-by-step facets of setting up and conducting your editing services, working with writers and publishers, promoting yourself and your expertise, and determining what to charge.

 

Writing Deep Scenes by Martha Alderson and Jordan Rosenfeld

Whether you're planning your first novel or have already written a first draft, you need to master the concepts of plot and scene to truly realize your story's potential. Writing Deep Scenes teaches you how to write strong, layered, and engaging scenes—the secret to memorable, page-turning plots.

 

A Writer's Guide to Characterization by Victoria Lynn Schmidt

In the best novels, characters undergo dramatic changes that keep readers turning pages. A Writer's Guide to Characterization shows you how to develop such meaningful character arcs in your own work—stories of transformation that will resonate with readers long after the story ends.

 

Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott

"Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he'd had three months to write. It was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my  brother's shoulder, and said, 'Bird by bird, buddy.  Just take it bird by bird.'"

 

On Being Stuck by Laraine Herring

Writer’s block. If you are a writer, you know it can be a haunting, terrifying force—a wolf at the door, a vast conspiracy, something that keeps you up at night, spinning your wheels, going nowhere. But what if we’ve been thinking about writer’s block all wrong? What if, by paying attention to its qualities and inquiring into its hidden gifts, we can release that power?